5) Does the Military use the Thin Green Line?

Official: NO                 

Supporters: NO

National Recognition: NO

There is no supporting evidence that any of the Unites States Military branches use the Thin Green Line as a symbol of any significant. Below are the widely known symbols that honor and support our brave men and women or the armed forces. 

Service Flag or Service Banner

A service flag or service banner is a banner that family members of those serving in the United States Armed Forces can display. The flag or banner is officially defined as a white field with a red border, with a blue star for each family member serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged. A gold star (with a blue edge) represents a family member that died during Military Operations involving conflict. This includes those who lost their lives during World War I, World War II, or during any subsequent period of armed hostilities in which the United States was engaged before July 1, 1958;

or those who lost or lose their lives after June 30, 1958:

  1. while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States;

  2. while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or

  3. while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict in which the United States is not a belligerent party against an opposing armed force;

 

or those who lost or lose their lives after March 28, 1973, as a result of:

  1. an international terrorist attack against the United States or a foreign nation friendly to the United States, recognized as such an attack by the Secretary of Defense; or

  2. military operations while serving outside the United States (including the commonwealths, territories, and possessions of the United States) as part of a peacekeeping force.

 

Battlefield Cross

The Fallen Soldier Battle Cross, Battlefield Cross, or Battle Cross is a symbolic replacement of a cross, or marker appropriate to an individual service member's religion, on the battlefield or at the base camp for a soldier who has been killed. It is made up of the soldier's rifle stuck into the ground or into the soldier's boots, with a helmet on top. Dog tags are sometimes placed on the rifle, and the boots of the dead soldier can be placed next to the rifle. The purpose is to show honor and respect for the dead at the battle site. The practice started during or prior to the American Civil War, as a means of identifying the bodies on the battleground before removal. Today, it is a means of showing respect for the dead amongst the still-living members of the troop. It is commonly seen in the field or base camp after a battle, especially among American troops in Afghanistan or Iraq. While it is used less today as a means of identification, it still serves as a method of mourning among the living, as attending the funeral is not always possible for soldiers still in combat.

Yellow Ribbon

The yellow ribbon saw renewed popularity in the United States during the Gulf War in the early 1990s. It appeared along with the slogan "support our troops", in the form of yellow ribbons tied to trees, and countless other contexts. It often had the implied meaning of "bring our troops home" from the Desert Shield and Desert Storm troop deployments. It appeared again during the 2003 invasion of Iraq with similar meanings, most prominently in the form of a yellow ribbon printed on magnetized material and displayed on the outside of automobiles.

© 2014 The Thin Green Line - Public Safety

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